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Strathblane Record of Applications for Parochial Relief 1888-1917

Strathblane Record of Applications for Parochial Relief 1888-1917

The applications for poor relief often survive as a separate series. Between 1845 and 1865 the information they contain is not much less than that in the registers of poor, but they are considerably less detailed than the general registers of poor introduced in 1865. For example, the application forms will not include the religious denomination, and probably there will be no details about dependants or other relatives. They will, however, contain far more entries per year than the registers, partly because of multiple applications from individual paupers, but also because they include the ‘casual poor’, that is, those relieved by the inspector without a decision by the board and therefore not on the poor roll.

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The Second Statistical Account: Strathblane, by Rev Hamilton Buchanan (1841).

The Second Statistical Account: Strathblane, by Rev Hamilton Buchanan (1841).

The second Statistical Account (or NSA) was initiated by the Sons and Daughters of the Clergy in 1832 and published by Blackwoods and Sons. The first edition, which took the form of 52 quarterly parts, was published between March 1834 and October 1845. A re-issue in 33 county volumes was published between 1841 and 1845. A second re-issue, in 1845, took the form of 15 collected county volumes. The Statistical Accounts of Scotland online service hold digitised versions of the second re-issue.

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Gazetteer of Scotland 1803 by F Ray

Gazetteer of Scotland 1803 by F Ray

Containing a particular and concise description of the counties, parishes, islands, cities, etc. With an account of the political constitution. Illustrated with an elegant map. F. Ray for W. Chalmers, 1803....

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The First Statistical Account: Strathblane by Rev Gavin Gibb (1796).

The First Statistical Account: Strathblane by Rev Gavin Gibb (1796).

The first Statistical Account (or OSA) was initiated by Sir John Sinclair and published by William Creech of Edinburgh. It took several years to obtain all the reports and, rather than waiting until he had the complete set in his possession, Sinclair issued volumes as and when there was sufficient content: this means that the reports are not arranged by county or region.

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